A sustainable product that you can trust

The argument for using precast concrete drainage products over other drainage materials has always been a compelling one, as the environmentally friendly, sustainable, heat resistant concrete continues to gain strength throughout its service life and leading drainage manufacturers, Marshalls CPM offering a 120 year design life on all of their precast concrete drainage products, its certainly one you can trust in.

In fact, Marshalls CPM have a 525mm ogee pipe at their Mells works in Somerset that was originally installed alongside the old castle in Norwich in 1891 and was excavated in June 1991 that shows no signs of deterioration and is structurally sound. When tested the pipe satisfied the requirements of the current standards for concrete pipes even though there were no standards when it was originally manufactured in 1891.

During the summer of this year, Marshalls CPM supplied flexible jointed concrete pipes to a £15m new sewer project in Frome Valley, Bristol which included the replacement of an existing pipe run to increase capacity for new developments in the area.

This work included digging up an old pipeline which included a 525mm rocker pipe that was manufactured at the Mells works in 1987. The rocker pipe is in perfect condition and has brought back many happy memories for employees, many of whom were just starting their working life with the Company in 1987.

When looking for a sustainable product that you can trust in, you can’t go wrong with precast concrete drainage solutions

Why use concrete in flood risk areas?

Over the last few years, climate conditions have altered causing widespread flooding across the UK. Developers are now continually looking for solutions to ensure that the disruption caused by flooding is kept to a minimum where possible and concrete has become a real sustainable solution for many.

Not only are concrete products inherently resistant to uplift or floatation due to their weight during flooding and cases of rising groundwater but they are also resistant to the damage from the impact of hard objects carried during flooding and recent developments in product innovation has seen hydraulic features being incorporated into concrete systems such as flow control devices and silt traps etc.

A wide range of engineered concrete SuDS products have been developed that can provide off-site solutions to on-site situations that make life easier and protect against the climate.

For more information on water management precast solutions please visit https://www.cpm-group.com/products/water-management/

To BIM or not to BIM?

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a new approach to project delivery that uses information to create a 3D model-based process of a building or infrastructure to improve the design, construction, and operation of the development.

The BIM profile provides information for creating and managing the infrastructure, ensuring that building projects are more efficient and more economic with less environmental impact, whilst still addressing wasted costs

BIM allows users to visualise and explore design ideas, simulate multiple alternatives, identify problem areas and improve productivity which is why many consultants are now using the BIM process within the construction industry and why many manufacturers now have their products available to download from arenas such as BIMSTORE as well as their own websites.

One leading consultant is so convinced of the success of using BIM that they have published their top 10 benefits of BIM, which can be found at www.mottmac.com/article/2385/building-information-modelling-bim

The only question left is what are you waiting for?

So why wouldn’t all sites be set up for maximum safety?

No one wants anyone on site to be hurt, the Health and Safety Executive promotes a mindset of everyone going home at the end of the day, safely. So why is site safety sometimes in question?

As manufacturers of precast concrete drainage products, that include pipes, tank systems and box culverts, we occasionally see somethings that are questionable, thankfully its reduced considerably in the last 10 years, but we still see a ladder that isn’t secure or a trench where we can’t see the true depth because of rainfall.

When questioned about these, we usually receive the same set of answers, “its someone else’s job”, “we don’t have the time” or “it costs too much”.

So let’s start with “its someone else’s job” – site safety is everyone’s job, how would you feel if something happened and you could have done something about it? Even if it was just telling the site safety officer a ladder haven’t been secured correctly.

“We don’t have the time” How long does it really take to put the end rails on a scaffold? To secure a set of ladders? To establish the depth of a trench? And finally “it costs too much” What is the cost of an extra ladder, trench box etc compared to the cost of an accident, injury or even fatality?

If you have a safe site, you are more likely to have a more productive one, one with clean work areas, proper access and equipment.